“Savagery” and “Civilization”: Dutch Brazil in the Kunst- and Wunderkammer

 Inhabitants of Brazil after Albert Eckhout, Fro, 1648

A hitherto unknown coconut cup from Dutch Brazil with carved representations sheds new light on the furthering of knowledge through pictorial representation that Count Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen promoted in the mid-seventeenth century to add luster to his official image. Featuring representations of cannibals and “civilized” aboriginals, the cup suggests that “savage” Brazil was “civilized” under the peaceful leadership of the Protestant count. The same political message recurs on several other Brazilian artifacts once owned by Johan Maurits, who deliberately deployed his exotic Kunstkammer objects as diplomatic gifts to enhance his reputation as governor-general of Brazil. But when objects are integrated into a different collection context, they undergo a connotational paradigm shift. This process is easy to see in the provenance of the carved coconut cup. By the time Alexander von Humboldt owned the cup (ca. 1800), its political message had long since been obscured. Rather than an object attesting to political power, the carved coconut cup, like other “Brasiliana” from Johan Maurits’s collection, had come to be regarded as an objective illustration of Brazilian natural history.

DOI: 10.5092/jhna.2011.3.2.3

Acknowledgements

First of all, I would like to thank Georg Laue for supporting the research that led to this paper. The article is an extended version of the lecture I gave at the 2010 Historians of Netherlandish Art Conference in Amsterdam. Of course it would not be so well written without the outstanding editorial work by Alison M. Kettering and Cindy Edwards.

Unknown Dutch,  The Humboldt Cup,  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 1 Humboldt Cup, Dutch, 1648–53, carved coconut, chased silver mount, no marks, height: 29 cm. Private collection (Photo: Munich, Kunstkammer, Georg Laue)
Unknown Dutch, The Humboldt Cup (detail),  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 2 Humboldt Cup (detail)
Albert Eckhout,  Tapuya Woman,  1646–53,  Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling, Copenhagen
Fig. 3 Albert Eckhout, Tapuya Woman, 1646–53, oil on canvas, 272 x 161 cm. Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling, Copenhagen, inv. no. N38A1 (Photo: Copenhagen, Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling)
 Inhabitants of Brazil after Albert Eckhout, Fro, 1648,
Fig. 4 Inhabitants of Brazil after Albert Eckhout, 1648, woodcut. From Willem Piso and Georg Markgraf, Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae (Leiden, 1648), p. 280
Jan van Kessel,  America (central panel), 1666,  Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Munich
Fig. 5 Jan van Kessel, America (central panel), 1666, oil on copper, 48.5 x 67.5 cm. Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Munich, inv. no. 1913 (artwork in the public domain).
Unknown Dutch, The Humboldt Cup (detail),  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 6 Humboldt Cup (detail)
 Coconut Cup (detail),  Dutch,  ca. 1650,  Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe, Dresden
Fig. 7 Coconut Cup (detail), Dutch, ca. 1650, carved coconut, fire-gilt silver mount, height: 34.5 cm. Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe, Dresden, inv. no. IV 325 (Photo: Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe)
 Tupinambà Man, From Willem Piso and Georg Markg, 1648,
Fig. 8 Tupinambà Man, 1648, woodcut. From Willem Piso and Georg Markgraf, Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae (Leiden, 1648), p. 270
Unknown Dutch, The Humboldt Cup (detail),  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 9 Humboldt Cup (detail)
Unknown Dutch,  Coconut Cup with Tapuya Fisherman,  dated 1653,  Historisk Museum, Bergen
Fig. 10 Coconut Cup with Tapuya Fisherman, Dutch, dated 1653, carved coconut, silver mount, height: 13.1 cm. Historisk Museum, Bergen, inv. no. B 513 (Photo: Bergen, Historisk Museum)
Friedrich Georg Weitsch,  Alexander von Humboldt Collecting Botanical Samp, 1806,  Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Nationalgalerie, Berlin
Fig. 11 Friedrich Georg Weitsch, Alexander von Humboldt Collecting Botanical Samples beneath a Banana Plant, 1806, oil on canvas, 126 x 92.5 cm. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Nationalgalerie, Berlin, inv. no. A II 828 (artwork in the public domain)
  1. 1. See most recently Michael Korey, Die Geometrie der Macht – Die Macht der Geometrie: Mathematische Instrumente und fürstliche Mechanik um 1600 aus dem Mathematisch-Physikalischen Salon (Munich and Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2007).

  2. 2. Klaus Maurice, Der drechselnde Souverän: Materialien zu einer fürstlichen Maschinenkunst (Zurich: Ineichen, 1985), 23ff.

  3. 3. Dominik Collet, Die Welt in der Stube: Begegnungen mit Außereuropa in Kunstkammern der Frühen Neuzeit (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2007), 335.

  4. 4. Rolf Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß in Mitteleuropa 1250–1800 (Mainz: Zabern, 1983), 20–21.

  5. 5. For instance, the coconut cup in Vienna (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Kaiserliche Schatzkammer, inv. no. 174); see Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 97, no. 45, pl. 25.

  6. 6. See Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, no. 207, pl. 109; no. 209, pl. 110; no. 220, pl. 115, for the coconut cups in the Bayerisches Nationamuseum in Munich, in the Historisk Museum in Bergen and in the Green Vault in Dresden. On the coconut cup in a private collection, see Rolf Fritz, “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien: Original und Abbild,” Weltkunst 56 (1986): 19–21. For the coconut cup in Braunschweig, see Weltenharmonie: Die Kunstkammer und die Ordnung des Wissens (Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 2000), 374, no. 447; Rudolf-Alexander Schütte, Die Kostbarkeiten der Renaissance und des Barocks: “Pretiosa und allerley Kunstsachen” aus den Kunst- und Raritätenkammern der Herzöge von Braunschweig-Lüneburg aus dem Hause Wolfenbüttel (Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 1997), 200–201, no. 201.

  7. 7. There is a comparable diadem of red parrot feathers typical of Tupinambá dress in the seventeenth century in the ethnographic collections of the National Museum in Copenhagen. It entered the Royal Danish Kunstkammer even before 1674, probably as a gift from Johan Maurits to Frederick III of Denmark; see Yves Le Fur, ed., D’un regard l’autre: Histoire des Regards européens sur l’Afrique, l’Amérique et l’Océanie (Paris: Actes Sud, 2006), 84, no. 90.

  8. 8. Theodor de Bry, America, book 3, part 3 (Frankfurt am Main, 1592), pl. 1. For this volume, see Rebecca Parker Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise: Albert Eckhout, Court Painter in Colonial Dutch Brazil (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2006), 107; and Anna Greve, Die Konstruktion Amerikas: Bilderpolitik in den “Grands Voyages” aus der Werkstatt de Bry (Cologne: Böhlau, 2004), 134ff.

  9. 9. The term Tapuya refers in the Tupi language to all peoples in the Brazilian hinterland who spoke another language than Tupi. The concept was taken over by the Dutch. The indigenous peoples represented by Eckhout are highly likely to have belonged to the Tarairiu tribe. See Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 117–20.

  10. 10. For the oil sketches for Eckhout’s paintings, see Quentin Buvelot, ed., Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil (Zwolle: Mauritshuis, 2004), 32.

  11. 11. Bodo-Michael Baumunk, “‘Von Brasilischen fremden Völkern’: Die Eingeborenen-Darstellungen Albert Eckhouts,” in Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas (Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982), 191.

  12. 12. The Eckhout paintings had not yet been executed so Wagener used worked-over sketches by the painter. See Dante Martins Teixeira, “The ‘Thierbuch’ of Zacharias Wagener of Dresden (1614–1668) and the Paintings of Albert Eckhout,” in Albert Eckhout volta ao Brasil / Albert Eckhout Returns to Brazil (Copenhagen: Nationalmuseet, 2002), 136–37, 171, 175.

  13. 13. Willem Piso and Georg Markgraf, Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae (Leiden, 1648), 280. According to the title page, the epilogue on the indigenous peoples (“appendice de Tapuyis et Chilensibus”) was written by Johannes de Laet, director of the Dutch West India Company. On this, see Dante Martins Teixeira, “Die Naturgeschichte Brasiliens in der Regierungszeit Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1637–1644): Die Bücher von Georg Markgraf und Willem Piso,” in Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679) der Brasilianer: Aufbruch in neue Welten(Siegen: Johann-Moritz-Gesellschaft, 2004), 79–80.

  14. 14. Collet, Die Welt in der Stube, 94ff., 113ff., especially 123, fig. 15.

  15. 15. Reproduced in Fritz, “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien,” 20, figs. 5, 6, and 21.

  16. 16. Baumunk, “Von Brasilischen fremden Völkern,” 192.

  17. 17. Albert Eckhout, Mamelucos Woman, oil on canvas, 271 x 170 cm. Copenhagen, Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling, inv. no. N38A6.

  18. 18. Anna Greve, “Die Kolonisation Brasiliens auf einer Nuß,” Dresdener Kunstblätter 50 (2006): 209.

  19. 19. Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 122, no. 209, pl. 110a.

  20. 20. Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, inv. no. R 5338; see Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 121, no. 207, pl. 1b.

  21. 21. Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 25ff.; and Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 110.

  22. 22. Caspar Barlaeus, Brasilianische Geschichte / Bey Achtjähriger inselbigen Landen geführeter Regierung Seiner Fürstlichen Gnaden Herrn Johan Maurits / Fürstens zu Nassau (Cleve: Silberling, 1659), 694.

  23. 23. P. J. P. Whitehead and M. Boeseman, A Portrait of Dutch 17th Century Brazil: Animals, Plants and People by the Artists of Johan Maurits of Nassau (Amsterdam, Oxford, and New York: North-Holland Publishers, 1989), 20–21.

  24. 24. Fritz, “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien,” 20. Fritz points out that Johan Maurits must have had carvers in his retinue as the ivory furniture pieces he gave to Friedrich Wilhelm I of Brandenburg in 1656 were made in Brazil according to the contemporary list of gifts. See Onder den Oranje boom: Niederländische Kunst und Kultur im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert an deutschen Fürstenhöfen, Katalogband (Munich: Hirmer, 2000), 190–92, no. 7/35. However, there is no trace of such a carver in Johan Maurits’s retinue.

  25. 25. Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 122, no. 209.

  26. 26. For the term ethnographisches Typenporträt (ethnographic type-portrait), see Denise Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie”: Bild- und Wissensproduktion über Niederländisch-Brasilien um 1640 (Marburg: Jonas-Verlag, 2009), 55–59; and Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 88–93.

  27. 27. The paintings are signed as if they were done in Brazil. The signature, however, is not the painter’s; it was added later. The paintings were most probably done between 1646 and 1653. See Florike Egmond and Peter Mason, “Albert E(e)ckhout, Court Painter,” in Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil (The Hague: Mauritshuis, 2004), 109–27, esp. 110.

  28. 28. For instance, Johan Maurits’s letter to Simon Arnauld de Pomponne details the objects he gave to Louis XIV in 1679 and points out their origin. See Rüdiger Joppien, “The Dutch Vision of Brazil,” in Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen 1604–1679: A Humanist Prince in Europe and Brazil, ed. Ernst van den Boogaart (The Hague: Johan Maurits van Nassau-Stichting, 1979), 326. Similarly, it was noted on the margin of the inventory of objects he gave to Friedrich Wilhelm I of Brandenburg: “All this made in Brazil” (dieses Alles in Brasilien gemacht); quoted in Ludwig Driesen, Leben des Fürsten Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (Berlin: Decker, 1849), 357.

  29. 29. Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie,” 23.

  30. 30. Ernst van den Boogart, “Brasilien hofieren – Johann Moritz’ politisches Projekt sichtbar gemacht,” in Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, eds. Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch (Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008), 73–92, esp. 77–83.

  31. 31. In 1643 sixty-four persons were fed at Vrijburgh Palace, of whom no fewer than eighteen were servants. Johan Maurits also employed one hundred and twenty additional servants, including eighty slaves, outside the main building: see Boogart, “Brasilien hofieren,” 73.

  32. 32. This is shown particularly clearly in Eckhout’s ethnographic type-portraits now in Copenhagen; probably after consulting his patron, the painter depicted the pair of Africans in a way that obscured their slave status and presented them as representatives of a rich African continent. See Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie,” 81–93.

  33. 33. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 54–59.

  34. 34. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 19.

  35. 35. For the representative function of this cycle in presenting Johan Maurits as a colonial overlord, see Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 20.

  36. 36. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 49–54.

  37. 37. See, for instance, Dante Martins Teixera, “Der Mythos der unberührten Natur: Die Naturgeschichte in Holländisch-Brasilien (1624–1654) und ihr Beitrag zur Kenntnis der jüngeren Geschichte der Fauna der Neuen Welt,” in Sein Feld war die Welt: Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, eds. Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch (Münster  and Munich: Waxmann, 2008), 197–232, esp. 206.

  38. 38. Thomas Thomsen, Albert Eckhout, ein niederländischer Maler und sein Gönner Moritz der Brasilianer: Ein Kulturbild aus dem 17. Jahrhundert (Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1938), 126–56.

  39. 39. Mogens Bencard, “Fürstliche Geschenke,” in Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, eds. Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch (Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008), 159–77, 161ff.

  40. 40. Bencard, “Fürstliche Geschenke,”174; and Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 205.

  41. 41. Egmond and Mason, “Albert E(e)ckhout,” 123.

  42. 42. Bencard, “Fürstliche Geschenke,” 174.

  43. 43. This series of tapestries is known as “Indes” or “Anciennes Indes.” See Madeleine Jarry, “Les ‘Indes’: Série triomphale de l’exotisme,” Connaissance des Arts 87 (1959): 62–69.

  44. 44. Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie,” 145–46.

  45. 45. Collet, Die Welt in der Stube, 332–39, 350.

  46. 46. Quoted in Schütte, Die Kostbarkeiten der Renaissance und des Barock, 200–201, no. 201; the scrap of paper is reproduced on p. 201: “Früchten Cocus genandt, gearbeitet / durch die wilten so genennet werden / Menschenfresser, oder Cabus, / in Ihrer Sbrach.” This inscription is in handwriting that is typical of the seventeenth century.

  47. 47. Quoted in Greve, “Die Kolonisation Brasiliens auf einer Nuß,” 205: “Eine indianische Nuß, mit einem silbernen Fuß und Deckel, mit Zierrath vergüldet auf der Nuß seyend Braßilianische Bilder Bäume und andere Gewächse geschnitten.”

  48. 48. In his letter of recommendation written to Johann Georg II of Saxony, Johan Maurits remarked that Eckhout was bringing all sorts of art works with him from Brazil. See Egmond and Mason, “Albert E(e)ckhout,” 125. It is usually assumed that this meant drawings by the painter – and among them would surely have been those drawings that were used as the basis for the paintings decorating Hof Lößnitz. On the other hand, the possibility cannot be eliminated that Eckhout also took the carved coconut cup with him (it is mentioned in the 1656 inventory as having been given to Johann Georg II of Saxony by his son and heir).

  49. 49. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 68.

  50. 50. There is, however, no list enumerating the objects Johan Maurits sent to Berlin in 1676; see Driesen, Leben des Fürsten Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen, 356–64.

  51. 51. Nicolaas A. Rupke, Alexander von Humboldt: A Metabiography (Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, and Bern: Lang, 2005), 196ff., provides a good survey of research on this subject.

  52. 52. Helmut de Terra, Alexander von Humboldt und seine Zeit (Wiesbaden: Brockhaus, 1956), 57.

  53. 53. Terra, Alexander von Humboldt, 56ff. On the other hand, von Haeften was involved at that time in an affair with Christiane von Waldenfels, who had given birth to a child of his as early as January 1794. He ultimately married her in October 1795 without, however, breaking off contact with the naturalist. See Christian Suckow, Der Oberbergrat privat: Freundschaften Alexander von Humboldts in seinen fränkischen Jahren (Berlin: Alexander-von-Humboldt-Forschungstelle, 1993), 18. For the wedding, see the letter written by Humboldt to Christiane von Waldenfels, late in October 1795, in Alexander von Humboldt: Aus meinem Leben, ed. Kurt-Reinhard Biermann (Munich: Beck, 1987), 152–53

  54. 54. In a letter to Karl Freiesleben dated April 18, 1797, Humboldt reports: “The Haeftens are having their child innoculated against smallpox, hence I am living with them again” (Haeftens lassen ihrem Kinde die Blattern einimpfen, ich wohne daher wieder bei ihnen); quoted in Biermann, Alexander von Humboldt, 154.

  55. 55. Letter from Humboldt to Christiane von Waldenfels, late October 1795; quoted in Biermann, Alexander von Humboldt, 152–53. See also Terra, Alexander von Humboldt, 57.

  56. 56. Communicated to the author in writing by Anne von Haeften, 2007. The second coconut cup was destroyed in Coburg during the Second World War.

  57. 57. Renate Löschner, “Humboldts Naturbild und seine Vorstellung von künstlerisch-physiognomischen Landschaftsbildern,” in Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas (Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982), 245–53.

  58. 58. Alexander von Humboldt, Kosmos: Entwurf einer physischen Weltbeschreibung, ed. Ottmar Ette and Oliver Lubrich (Frankfurt am Main: Eichborn, 2004), 230: “sehr ausgezeichneten großen Oelbilder.”

  59. 59. Humboldt, Kosmos, 230: “Beispiele physiognomischer Naturdarstellung.”

Brienen, Rebecca Parker. Visions of Savage Paradise: Albert Eckhout, Court Painter in Colonial Dutch Brazil. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2006.

Barlaeus, Caspar. Brasilianische Geschichte / Bey Achtjähriger inselbigen Landen geführeter Regierung Seiner Fürstlichen Gnaden Herrn Johan Maurits / Fürstens zu Nassau. Cleve: Silberling, 1659.

Baumunk, Bodo-Michael. “‘Von Brasilischen fremden Völkern’: Die Eingeborenen-Darstellungen Albert Eckhouts.” In Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas, 188–201. Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982.

Bencard, Mogens. “Fürstliche Geschenke.” In Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, edited by Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch, 159–77. Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008.

Biermann, Kurt-Reinhard, ed. Alexander von Humboldt: Aus meinem Leben. Munich: Beck, 1987.

Boogart, Ernst van den. “Brasilien hofieren – Johann Moritz’ politisches Projekt sichtbar gemacht.” In Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, edited by Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch, 73–92. Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008.

Buvelot, Quentin, ed. Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil. Exh. cat. Zwolle: Mauritshuis, 2004.

Collet, Dominik. Die Welt in der Stube: Begegnungen mit Außereuropa in Kunstkammern der Frühen Neuzeit. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2007.

Daum, Denise. Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie”: Bild- und Wissensproduktion über Niederländisch-Brasilien um 1640. Marburg: Jonas-Verlag, 2009.

Driesen, Ludwig. Leben des Fürsten Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen. Berlin: Decker, 1849.

Egmond, Florike, and Peter Mason. “Albert E(e)ckhout, Court Painter.” In Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil, 109–27. Exh. cat. The Hague: Mauritshuis, 2004.

Fritz, Rolf. Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß in Mitteleuropa 1250–1800. Mainz: Zabern, 1983.

Fritz, Rolf. “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien: Original und Abbild.” Weltkunst 56 (1986): 19–21.

Greve, Anna. Die Konstruktion Amerikas: Bilderpolitik in den “Grands Voyages” aus der Werkstatt de Bry. Cologne: Böhlau, 2004.

Greve, Anna. “Die Kolonisation Brasiliens auf einer Nuß.” Dresdener Kunstblätter 50 (2006): 205–10.

Humboldt, Alexander von. Kosmos: Entwurf einer physischen Weltbeschreibung. Edited by Ottmar Ette and Oliver Lubrich. Frankfurt am Main: Eichborn, 2004.

Jarry, Madeleine. “Les ‘Indes’: Série triomphale de l’exotisme.” Connaissance des Arts 87 (1959): 62–69.

Joppien, Rüdiger. “The Dutch Vision of Brazil.” In Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen 1604–1679: A Humanist Prince in Europe and Brazil, edited by Ernst van den Boogaart, 296–376. The Hague: Johan Maurits van Nassau-Stichting, 1979.

Korey, Michael. Die Geometrie der Macht – Die Macht der Geometrie: Mathematische Instrumente und fürstliche Mechanik um 1600 aus dem Mathematisch-Physikalischen Salon. Munich and Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2007.

Le Fur, Yves, ed. D’un regard l’autre: Histoire des Regards européens sur l’Afrique, l’Amérique et l’Océanie. Paris: Actes Sud, 2006.

Löschner, Renate. “Humboldts Naturbild und seine Vorstellung von künstlerisch-physiognomischen Landschaftsbildern.” In Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas, 245–53. Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982.

Maurice, Klaus. Der drechselnde Souverän: Materialien zu einer fürstlichen Maschinenkunst. Zurich: Ineichen, 1985.

Onder den Oranje boom: Niederländische Kunst und Kultur im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert an deutschen Fürstenhöfen, Katalogband. Munich: Hirmer, 2000.

Piso, Willem, and Georg Markgraf. Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae. Leiden, 1648.

Rupke, Nicolaas A. Alexander von Humboldt: A Metabiography. Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, and Bern: Lang, 2005.

Schütte, Rudolf-Alexander. Die Kostbarkeiten der Renaissance und des Barocks: “Pretiosa und allerley Kunstsachen” aus den Kunst- und Raritätenkammern der Herzöge von Braunschweig-Lüneburg aus dem Hause Wolfenbüttel. Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 1997.

Suckow, Christian. Der Oberbergrat privat: Freundschaften Alexander von Humboldts in seinen fränkischen Jahren. Berlin: Alexander-von-Humboldt-Forschungstelle, 1993.

Teixeira, Dante Martins. “The “Thierbuch” of Zacharias Wagener of Dresden (1614–1668) and the Paintings of Albert Eckhout.” In Albert Eckhout volta ao Brasil / Albert Eckhout Returns to Brazil, 167–85. Copenhagen: Nationalmuseet, 2002.

Teixeira, Dante Martins. “Die Naturgeschichte Brasiliens in der Regierungszeit Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1637–1644): Die Bücher von Georg Markgraf und Willem Piso.” In Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679) der Brasilianer: Aufbruch in neue Welten, 76–88. Siegen: Johann-Moritz-Gesellschaft, 2004.

Teixera, Dante Martins. “Der Mythos der unberührten Natur: Die Naturgeschichte in Holländisch-Brasilien (1624–1654) und ihr Beitrag zur Kenntnis der jüngeren Geschichte der Fauna der Neuen Welt.” In Sein Feld war die Welt: Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, edited by Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch, 197–232. Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008.

Terra, Helmut de. Alexander von Humboldt und seine Zeit. Wiesbaden: Brockhaus, 1956.

Thomsen, Thomas. Albert Eckhout, ein niederländischer Maler und sein Gönner Moritz der Brasilianer: Ein Kulturbild aus dem 17. Jahrhundert. Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1938.

Weltenharmonie: Die Kunstkammer und die Ordnung des Wissens. Exh. cat. Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 2000.

Whitehead, P. J. P. and M. Boeseman. A Portrait of Dutch 17th Century Brazil: Animals, Plants and People by the Artists of Johan Maurits of Nassau. Amsterdam, Oxford, and New York: North-Holland Publishers, 1989.

List of Illustrations

Unknown Dutch,  The Humboldt Cup,  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 1 Humboldt Cup, Dutch, 1648–53, carved coconut, chased silver mount, no marks, height: 29 cm. Private collection (Photo: Munich, Kunstkammer, Georg Laue)
Unknown Dutch, The Humboldt Cup (detail),  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 2 Humboldt Cup (detail)
Albert Eckhout,  Tapuya Woman,  1646–53,  Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling, Copenhagen
Fig. 3 Albert Eckhout, Tapuya Woman, 1646–53, oil on canvas, 272 x 161 cm. Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling, Copenhagen, inv. no. N38A1 (Photo: Copenhagen, Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling)
 Inhabitants of Brazil after Albert Eckhout, Fro, 1648,
Fig. 4 Inhabitants of Brazil after Albert Eckhout, 1648, woodcut. From Willem Piso and Georg Markgraf, Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae (Leiden, 1648), p. 280
Jan van Kessel,  America (central panel), 1666,  Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Munich
Fig. 5 Jan van Kessel, America (central panel), 1666, oil on copper, 48.5 x 67.5 cm. Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Munich, inv. no. 1913 (artwork in the public domain).
Unknown Dutch, The Humboldt Cup (detail),  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 6 Humboldt Cup (detail)
 Coconut Cup (detail),  Dutch,  ca. 1650,  Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe, Dresden
Fig. 7 Coconut Cup (detail), Dutch, ca. 1650, carved coconut, fire-gilt silver mount, height: 34.5 cm. Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe, Dresden, inv. no. IV 325 (Photo: Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe)
 Tupinambà Man, From Willem Piso and Georg Markg, 1648,
Fig. 8 Tupinambà Man, 1648, woodcut. From Willem Piso and Georg Markgraf, Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae (Leiden, 1648), p. 270
Unknown Dutch, The Humboldt Cup (detail),  1648–53,  Private collection
Fig. 9 Humboldt Cup (detail)
Unknown Dutch,  Coconut Cup with Tapuya Fisherman,  dated 1653,  Historisk Museum, Bergen
Fig. 10 Coconut Cup with Tapuya Fisherman, Dutch, dated 1653, carved coconut, silver mount, height: 13.1 cm. Historisk Museum, Bergen, inv. no. B 513 (Photo: Bergen, Historisk Museum)
Friedrich Georg Weitsch,  Alexander von Humboldt Collecting Botanical Samp, 1806,  Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Nationalgalerie, Berlin
Fig. 11 Friedrich Georg Weitsch, Alexander von Humboldt Collecting Botanical Samples beneath a Banana Plant, 1806, oil on canvas, 126 x 92.5 cm. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Nationalgalerie, Berlin, inv. no. A II 828 (artwork in the public domain)

Footnotes

  1. 1. See most recently Michael Korey, Die Geometrie der Macht – Die Macht der Geometrie: Mathematische Instrumente und fürstliche Mechanik um 1600 aus dem Mathematisch-Physikalischen Salon (Munich and Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2007).

  2. 2. Klaus Maurice, Der drechselnde Souverän: Materialien zu einer fürstlichen Maschinenkunst (Zurich: Ineichen, 1985), 23ff.

  3. 3. Dominik Collet, Die Welt in der Stube: Begegnungen mit Außereuropa in Kunstkammern der Frühen Neuzeit (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2007), 335.

  4. 4. Rolf Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß in Mitteleuropa 1250–1800 (Mainz: Zabern, 1983), 20–21.

  5. 5. For instance, the coconut cup in Vienna (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Kaiserliche Schatzkammer, inv. no. 174); see Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 97, no. 45, pl. 25.

  6. 6. See Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, no. 207, pl. 109; no. 209, pl. 110; no. 220, pl. 115, for the coconut cups in the Bayerisches Nationamuseum in Munich, in the Historisk Museum in Bergen and in the Green Vault in Dresden. On the coconut cup in a private collection, see Rolf Fritz, “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien: Original und Abbild,” Weltkunst 56 (1986): 19–21. For the coconut cup in Braunschweig, see Weltenharmonie: Die Kunstkammer und die Ordnung des Wissens (Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 2000), 374, no. 447; Rudolf-Alexander Schütte, Die Kostbarkeiten der Renaissance und des Barocks: “Pretiosa und allerley Kunstsachen” aus den Kunst- und Raritätenkammern der Herzöge von Braunschweig-Lüneburg aus dem Hause Wolfenbüttel (Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 1997), 200–201, no. 201.

  7. 7. There is a comparable diadem of red parrot feathers typical of Tupinambá dress in the seventeenth century in the ethnographic collections of the National Museum in Copenhagen. It entered the Royal Danish Kunstkammer even before 1674, probably as a gift from Johan Maurits to Frederick III of Denmark; see Yves Le Fur, ed., D’un regard l’autre: Histoire des Regards européens sur l’Afrique, l’Amérique et l’Océanie (Paris: Actes Sud, 2006), 84, no. 90.

  8. 8. Theodor de Bry, America, book 3, part 3 (Frankfurt am Main, 1592), pl. 1. For this volume, see Rebecca Parker Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise: Albert Eckhout, Court Painter in Colonial Dutch Brazil (Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2006), 107; and Anna Greve, Die Konstruktion Amerikas: Bilderpolitik in den “Grands Voyages” aus der Werkstatt de Bry (Cologne: Böhlau, 2004), 134ff.

  9. 9. The term Tapuya refers in the Tupi language to all peoples in the Brazilian hinterland who spoke another language than Tupi. The concept was taken over by the Dutch. The indigenous peoples represented by Eckhout are highly likely to have belonged to the Tarairiu tribe. See Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 117–20.

  10. 10. For the oil sketches for Eckhout’s paintings, see Quentin Buvelot, ed., Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil (Zwolle: Mauritshuis, 2004), 32.

  11. 11. Bodo-Michael Baumunk, “‘Von Brasilischen fremden Völkern’: Die Eingeborenen-Darstellungen Albert Eckhouts,” in Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas (Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982), 191.

  12. 12. The Eckhout paintings had not yet been executed so Wagener used worked-over sketches by the painter. See Dante Martins Teixeira, “The ‘Thierbuch’ of Zacharias Wagener of Dresden (1614–1668) and the Paintings of Albert Eckhout,” in Albert Eckhout volta ao Brasil / Albert Eckhout Returns to Brazil (Copenhagen: Nationalmuseet, 2002), 136–37, 171, 175.

  13. 13. Willem Piso and Georg Markgraf, Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae (Leiden, 1648), 280. According to the title page, the epilogue on the indigenous peoples (“appendice de Tapuyis et Chilensibus”) was written by Johannes de Laet, director of the Dutch West India Company. On this, see Dante Martins Teixeira, “Die Naturgeschichte Brasiliens in der Regierungszeit Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1637–1644): Die Bücher von Georg Markgraf und Willem Piso,” in Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679) der Brasilianer: Aufbruch in neue Welten(Siegen: Johann-Moritz-Gesellschaft, 2004), 79–80.

  14. 14. Collet, Die Welt in der Stube, 94ff., 113ff., especially 123, fig. 15.

  15. 15. Reproduced in Fritz, “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien,” 20, figs. 5, 6, and 21.

  16. 16. Baumunk, “Von Brasilischen fremden Völkern,” 192.

  17. 17. Albert Eckhout, Mamelucos Woman, oil on canvas, 271 x 170 cm. Copenhagen, Nationalmuseet, Etnografisk Samling, inv. no. N38A6.

  18. 18. Anna Greve, “Die Kolonisation Brasiliens auf einer Nuß,” Dresdener Kunstblätter 50 (2006): 209.

  19. 19. Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 122, no. 209, pl. 110a.

  20. 20. Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, inv. no. R 5338; see Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 121, no. 207, pl. 1b.

  21. 21. Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 25ff.; and Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 110.

  22. 22. Caspar Barlaeus, Brasilianische Geschichte / Bey Achtjähriger inselbigen Landen geführeter Regierung Seiner Fürstlichen Gnaden Herrn Johan Maurits / Fürstens zu Nassau (Cleve: Silberling, 1659), 694.

  23. 23. P. J. P. Whitehead and M. Boeseman, A Portrait of Dutch 17th Century Brazil: Animals, Plants and People by the Artists of Johan Maurits of Nassau (Amsterdam, Oxford, and New York: North-Holland Publishers, 1989), 20–21.

  24. 24. Fritz, “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien,” 20. Fritz points out that Johan Maurits must have had carvers in his retinue as the ivory furniture pieces he gave to Friedrich Wilhelm I of Brandenburg in 1656 were made in Brazil according to the contemporary list of gifts. See Onder den Oranje boom: Niederländische Kunst und Kultur im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert an deutschen Fürstenhöfen, Katalogband (Munich: Hirmer, 2000), 190–92, no. 7/35. However, there is no trace of such a carver in Johan Maurits’s retinue.

  25. 25. Fritz, Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß, 122, no. 209.

  26. 26. For the term ethnographisches Typenporträt (ethnographic type-portrait), see Denise Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie”: Bild- und Wissensproduktion über Niederländisch-Brasilien um 1640 (Marburg: Jonas-Verlag, 2009), 55–59; and Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 88–93.

  27. 27. The paintings are signed as if they were done in Brazil. The signature, however, is not the painter’s; it was added later. The paintings were most probably done between 1646 and 1653. See Florike Egmond and Peter Mason, “Albert E(e)ckhout, Court Painter,” in Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil (The Hague: Mauritshuis, 2004), 109–27, esp. 110.

  28. 28. For instance, Johan Maurits’s letter to Simon Arnauld de Pomponne details the objects he gave to Louis XIV in 1679 and points out their origin. See Rüdiger Joppien, “The Dutch Vision of Brazil,” in Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen 1604–1679: A Humanist Prince in Europe and Brazil, ed. Ernst van den Boogaart (The Hague: Johan Maurits van Nassau-Stichting, 1979), 326. Similarly, it was noted on the margin of the inventory of objects he gave to Friedrich Wilhelm I of Brandenburg: “All this made in Brazil” (dieses Alles in Brasilien gemacht); quoted in Ludwig Driesen, Leben des Fürsten Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (Berlin: Decker, 1849), 357.

  29. 29. Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie,” 23.

  30. 30. Ernst van den Boogart, “Brasilien hofieren – Johann Moritz’ politisches Projekt sichtbar gemacht,” in Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, eds. Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch (Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008), 73–92, esp. 77–83.

  31. 31. In 1643 sixty-four persons were fed at Vrijburgh Palace, of whom no fewer than eighteen were servants. Johan Maurits also employed one hundred and twenty additional servants, including eighty slaves, outside the main building: see Boogart, “Brasilien hofieren,” 73.

  32. 32. This is shown particularly clearly in Eckhout’s ethnographic type-portraits now in Copenhagen; probably after consulting his patron, the painter depicted the pair of Africans in a way that obscured their slave status and presented them as representatives of a rich African continent. See Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie,” 81–93.

  33. 33. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 54–59.

  34. 34. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 19.

  35. 35. For the representative function of this cycle in presenting Johan Maurits as a colonial overlord, see Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 20.

  36. 36. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 49–54.

  37. 37. See, for instance, Dante Martins Teixera, “Der Mythos der unberührten Natur: Die Naturgeschichte in Holländisch-Brasilien (1624–1654) und ihr Beitrag zur Kenntnis der jüngeren Geschichte der Fauna der Neuen Welt,” in Sein Feld war die Welt: Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, eds. Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch (Münster  and Munich: Waxmann, 2008), 197–232, esp. 206.

  38. 38. Thomas Thomsen, Albert Eckhout, ein niederländischer Maler und sein Gönner Moritz der Brasilianer: Ein Kulturbild aus dem 17. Jahrhundert (Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1938), 126–56.

  39. 39. Mogens Bencard, “Fürstliche Geschenke,” in Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, eds. Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch (Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008), 159–77, 161ff.

  40. 40. Bencard, “Fürstliche Geschenke,”174; and Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 205.

  41. 41. Egmond and Mason, “Albert E(e)ckhout,” 123.

  42. 42. Bencard, “Fürstliche Geschenke,” 174.

  43. 43. This series of tapestries is known as “Indes” or “Anciennes Indes.” See Madeleine Jarry, “Les ‘Indes’: Série triomphale de l’exotisme,” Connaissance des Arts 87 (1959): 62–69.

  44. 44. Daum, Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie,” 145–46.

  45. 45. Collet, Die Welt in der Stube, 332–39, 350.

  46. 46. Quoted in Schütte, Die Kostbarkeiten der Renaissance und des Barock, 200–201, no. 201; the scrap of paper is reproduced on p. 201: “Früchten Cocus genandt, gearbeitet / durch die wilten so genennet werden / Menschenfresser, oder Cabus, / in Ihrer Sbrach.” This inscription is in handwriting that is typical of the seventeenth century.

  47. 47. Quoted in Greve, “Die Kolonisation Brasiliens auf einer Nuß,” 205: “Eine indianische Nuß, mit einem silbernen Fuß und Deckel, mit Zierrath vergüldet auf der Nuß seyend Braßilianische Bilder Bäume und andere Gewächse geschnitten.”

  48. 48. In his letter of recommendation written to Johann Georg II of Saxony, Johan Maurits remarked that Eckhout was bringing all sorts of art works with him from Brazil. See Egmond and Mason, “Albert E(e)ckhout,” 125. It is usually assumed that this meant drawings by the painter – and among them would surely have been those drawings that were used as the basis for the paintings decorating Hof Lößnitz. On the other hand, the possibility cannot be eliminated that Eckhout also took the carved coconut cup with him (it is mentioned in the 1656 inventory as having been given to Johann Georg II of Saxony by his son and heir).

  49. 49. Brienen, Visions of Savage Paradise, 68.

  50. 50. There is, however, no list enumerating the objects Johan Maurits sent to Berlin in 1676; see Driesen, Leben des Fürsten Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen, 356–64.

  51. 51. Nicolaas A. Rupke, Alexander von Humboldt: A Metabiography (Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, and Bern: Lang, 2005), 196ff., provides a good survey of research on this subject.

  52. 52. Helmut de Terra, Alexander von Humboldt und seine Zeit (Wiesbaden: Brockhaus, 1956), 57.

  53. 53. Terra, Alexander von Humboldt, 56ff. On the other hand, von Haeften was involved at that time in an affair with Christiane von Waldenfels, who had given birth to a child of his as early as January 1794. He ultimately married her in October 1795 without, however, breaking off contact with the naturalist. See Christian Suckow, Der Oberbergrat privat: Freundschaften Alexander von Humboldts in seinen fränkischen Jahren (Berlin: Alexander-von-Humboldt-Forschungstelle, 1993), 18. For the wedding, see the letter written by Humboldt to Christiane von Waldenfels, late in October 1795, in Alexander von Humboldt: Aus meinem Leben, ed. Kurt-Reinhard Biermann (Munich: Beck, 1987), 152–53

  54. 54. In a letter to Karl Freiesleben dated April 18, 1797, Humboldt reports: “The Haeftens are having their child innoculated against smallpox, hence I am living with them again” (Haeftens lassen ihrem Kinde die Blattern einimpfen, ich wohne daher wieder bei ihnen); quoted in Biermann, Alexander von Humboldt, 154.

  55. 55. Letter from Humboldt to Christiane von Waldenfels, late October 1795; quoted in Biermann, Alexander von Humboldt, 152–53. See also Terra, Alexander von Humboldt, 57.

  56. 56. Communicated to the author in writing by Anne von Haeften, 2007. The second coconut cup was destroyed in Coburg during the Second World War.

  57. 57. Renate Löschner, “Humboldts Naturbild und seine Vorstellung von künstlerisch-physiognomischen Landschaftsbildern,” in Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas (Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982), 245–53.

  58. 58. Alexander von Humboldt, Kosmos: Entwurf einer physischen Weltbeschreibung, ed. Ottmar Ette and Oliver Lubrich (Frankfurt am Main: Eichborn, 2004), 230: “sehr ausgezeichneten großen Oelbilder.”

  59. 59. Humboldt, Kosmos, 230: “Beispiele physiognomischer Naturdarstellung.”

Bibliography

Brienen, Rebecca Parker. Visions of Savage Paradise: Albert Eckhout, Court Painter in Colonial Dutch Brazil. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2006.

Barlaeus, Caspar. Brasilianische Geschichte / Bey Achtjähriger inselbigen Landen geführeter Regierung Seiner Fürstlichen Gnaden Herrn Johan Maurits / Fürstens zu Nassau. Cleve: Silberling, 1659.

Baumunk, Bodo-Michael. “‘Von Brasilischen fremden Völkern’: Die Eingeborenen-Darstellungen Albert Eckhouts.” In Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas, 188–201. Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982.

Bencard, Mogens. “Fürstliche Geschenke.” In Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, edited by Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch, 159–77. Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008.

Biermann, Kurt-Reinhard, ed. Alexander von Humboldt: Aus meinem Leben. Munich: Beck, 1987.

Boogart, Ernst van den. “Brasilien hofieren – Johann Moritz’ politisches Projekt sichtbar gemacht.” In Sein Feld war die Welt: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, edited by Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch, 73–92. Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008.

Buvelot, Quentin, ed. Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil. Exh. cat. Zwolle: Mauritshuis, 2004.

Collet, Dominik. Die Welt in der Stube: Begegnungen mit Außereuropa in Kunstkammern der Frühen Neuzeit. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2007.

Daum, Denise. Albert Eckhouts “gemalte Kolonie”: Bild- und Wissensproduktion über Niederländisch-Brasilien um 1640. Marburg: Jonas-Verlag, 2009.

Driesen, Ludwig. Leben des Fürsten Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen. Berlin: Decker, 1849.

Egmond, Florike, and Peter Mason. “Albert E(e)ckhout, Court Painter.” In Albert Eckhout: A Dutch Artist in Brazil, 109–27. Exh. cat. The Hague: Mauritshuis, 2004.

Fritz, Rolf. Die Gefäße aus Kokosnuß in Mitteleuropa 1250–1800. Mainz: Zabern, 1983.

Fritz, Rolf. “Ein Kokosnuß-Pokal aus Niederländisch-Brasilien: Original und Abbild.” Weltkunst 56 (1986): 19–21.

Greve, Anna. Die Konstruktion Amerikas: Bilderpolitik in den “Grands Voyages” aus der Werkstatt de Bry. Cologne: Böhlau, 2004.

Greve, Anna. “Die Kolonisation Brasiliens auf einer Nuß.” Dresdener Kunstblätter 50 (2006): 205–10.

Humboldt, Alexander von. Kosmos: Entwurf einer physischen Weltbeschreibung. Edited by Ottmar Ette and Oliver Lubrich. Frankfurt am Main: Eichborn, 2004.

Jarry, Madeleine. “Les ‘Indes’: Série triomphale de l’exotisme.” Connaissance des Arts 87 (1959): 62–69.

Joppien, Rüdiger. “The Dutch Vision of Brazil.” In Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen 1604–1679: A Humanist Prince in Europe and Brazil, edited by Ernst van den Boogaart, 296–376. The Hague: Johan Maurits van Nassau-Stichting, 1979.

Korey, Michael. Die Geometrie der Macht – Die Macht der Geometrie: Mathematische Instrumente und fürstliche Mechanik um 1600 aus dem Mathematisch-Physikalischen Salon. Munich and Berlin: Deutscher Kunstverlag, 2007.

Le Fur, Yves, ed. D’un regard l’autre: Histoire des Regards européens sur l’Afrique, l’Amérique et l’Océanie. Paris: Actes Sud, 2006.

Löschner, Renate. “Humboldts Naturbild und seine Vorstellung von künstlerisch-physiognomischen Landschaftsbildern.” In Mythen der Neuen Welt: Zur Entdeckungsgeschichte Lateinamerikas, 245–53. Berlin: Frölich und Kaufmann, 1982.

Maurice, Klaus. Der drechselnde Souverän: Materialien zu einer fürstlichen Maschinenkunst. Zurich: Ineichen, 1985.

Onder den Oranje boom: Niederländische Kunst und Kultur im 17. und 18. Jahrhundert an deutschen Fürstenhöfen, Katalogband. Munich: Hirmer, 2000.

Piso, Willem, and Georg Markgraf. Historia rerum naturalium Brasiliae. Leiden, 1648.

Rupke, Nicolaas A. Alexander von Humboldt: A Metabiography. Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, and Bern: Lang, 2005.

Schütte, Rudolf-Alexander. Die Kostbarkeiten der Renaissance und des Barocks: “Pretiosa und allerley Kunstsachen” aus den Kunst- und Raritätenkammern der Herzöge von Braunschweig-Lüneburg aus dem Hause Wolfenbüttel. Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 1997.

Suckow, Christian. Der Oberbergrat privat: Freundschaften Alexander von Humboldts in seinen fränkischen Jahren. Berlin: Alexander-von-Humboldt-Forschungstelle, 1993.

Teixeira, Dante Martins. “The “Thierbuch” of Zacharias Wagener of Dresden (1614–1668) and the Paintings of Albert Eckhout.” In Albert Eckhout volta ao Brasil / Albert Eckhout Returns to Brazil, 167–85. Copenhagen: Nationalmuseet, 2002.

Teixeira, Dante Martins. “Die Naturgeschichte Brasiliens in der Regierungszeit Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1637–1644): Die Bücher von Georg Markgraf und Willem Piso.” In Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604–1679) der Brasilianer: Aufbruch in neue Welten, 76–88. Siegen: Johann-Moritz-Gesellschaft, 2004.

Teixera, Dante Martins. “Der Mythos der unberührten Natur: Die Naturgeschichte in Holländisch-Brasilien (1624–1654) und ihr Beitrag zur Kenntnis der jüngeren Geschichte der Fauna der Neuen Welt.” In Sein Feld war die Welt: Johan Maurits of Nassau-Siegen (1604-1679); Von Siegen über die Niederlande und Brasilien nach Brandenburg, edited by Gerhard Brunn and Cornelius Neutsch, 197–232. Münster and Munich: Waxmann, 2008.

Terra, Helmut de. Alexander von Humboldt und seine Zeit. Wiesbaden: Brockhaus, 1956.

Thomsen, Thomas. Albert Eckhout, ein niederländischer Maler und sein Gönner Moritz der Brasilianer: Ein Kulturbild aus dem 17. Jahrhundert. Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1938.

Weltenharmonie: Die Kunstkammer und die Ordnung des Wissens. Exh. cat. Braunschweig: Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, 2000.

Whitehead, P. J. P. and M. Boeseman. A Portrait of Dutch 17th Century Brazil: Animals, Plants and People by the Artists of Johan Maurits of Nassau. Amsterdam, Oxford, and New York: North-Holland Publishers, 1989.

Imprint

Review: Peer Review (Double Blind)
DOI: 10.5092/jhna.2011.3.2.3
License:
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Recommended Citation:
Virginie Spenlé, "“Savagery” and “Civilization”: Dutch Brazil in the Kunst- and Wunderkammer," Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art 3:2 (Summer 2011) DOI: 10.5092/jhna.2011.3.2.3