Albrecht Dürer’s Peasant Engravings: A Different Laocoön, or the Birth of Aesthetic Subversion in the Spirit of the Reformation

Albrecht Dürer,  Bagpiper, 1514, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Albrecht Dürer,  Peasant Couple Dancing, 1514, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

This article addresses the genesis and reception of three engravings representing peasants made by Albrecht Dürer between the years 1514 and 1519. These images have been interpreted as social commentary or low-brow farce; I argue their importance is art theoretical. In my view, they are the result of Dürer’s 1505–6 visit to Venice, where Italian artists derided his ability to work in a classical idiom. In response, I argue, Dürer developed a method of imitation that I call “inverse citation,” which veils a famous antique model in the guise of a boorish peasant. Following Luther’s rebellion against the Church, northern artists took up this technique with more polemical aims.

DOI: 10.5092/jhna.2011.3.1.2

Acknowledgements

This article was translated from German by Ulrike Schenk. I would like to thank the following people for their help in preparing the English version for publication: Jessica Buskirk, Kerstin Küster, Wolf Seiter, and Alexandra Schellenberg. I would also like to thank the JHNA readers for their helpful comments. This article lays out the themes of a research project that I am leading, which is entitled “The Subversive Image” and is part of the Collaborative Research Centre 804 (SFB 804) at the Technical University Dresden, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. I would like to thank SFB 804 and the DFG for their support.

Albrecht Dürer,  Bagpiper, 1514,  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Fig. 1 Albrecht Dürer, Bagpiper, 1514, engraving, 11.5 x 7.4 cm. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (artwork in the public domain).
Albrecht Dürer,  Peasant Couple Dancing, 1514,  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Fig. 2 Albrecht Dürer, Peasant Couple Dancing, 1514, engraving, 11.7 x 7.5 cm. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (artwork in the public domain).
Roman copy after Praxiteles,  Piping Faun,  second century C.E.,  Collection Borghese, Rome
Fig. 3 Roman copy after Praxiteles, Piping Faun, second century C.E., marble, h. 132 cm. Collection Borghese, Rome (artwork in the public domain).
Jacopo Alari-Bonacolsi, called Antico,  Young Hercules Reading,  ca. 1500,  Private Collection
Fig. 4 Jacopo Alari-Bonacolsi, called Antico, Young Hercules Reading, ca. 1500, bronze, h. 22.9 cm. Private Collection (artwork in the public domain).
Woodcut for 54th chapter, Sebastian Brant, Ship , 1495,
Fig. 5 Woodcut for 54th chapter, Sebastian Brant, Ship of Fools, 1495 (artwork in the public domain).
 Laocoön Group,  mid-first century C.E.,  Vatican Collection, Rome
Fig. 6 Laocoön Group, mid-first century C.E., marble, h. 242 cm. Vatican Collection, Rome (artwork in public domain).
Albrecht Dürer,  Samson Slaying the Philistines (sketches for th, 1510,  Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Fig. 7 Albrecht Dürer, Samson Slaying the Philistines (sketches for the Georg Fugger Epitaph), 1510, gray wash and brush on colored paper, 32.1 x 15.6 cm. Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin (artwork in the public domain).
Albrecht Dürer,  Peasants at the Market, 1519,  Metropolitan Museum, New York
Fig. 8 Albrecht Dürer, Peasants at the Market, 1519, engraving, 11.6 x 7.3 cm. Metropolitan Museum, New York (artwork in the public domain).
Master bxg,  Unequal Lovers,  ca. 1480,  Bibliothèque nationale, Paris
Fig. 9 Master bxg, Unequal Lovers, ca. 1480, engraving, 8.3 x 5.9 cm. Bibliothèque nationale, Paris (artwork in the public domain).
 Sarcophagus Rinuccini,  second century C.E.,  Antikensammlung, Altes Museum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Fig. 10 Sarcophagus Rinuccini, second century C.E., marble, h. 212 cm. Antikensammlung, Altes Museum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin,  (artwork in the public domain).
Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert,  Bacchus, 1522,  Print Room, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
Fig. 11 Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert, Bacchus, 1522, engraving and etching, 7.2 x 5.1 cm. Print Room, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (artwork in the public domain).
Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert,  The Drunken Drummer, 1525,  Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden
Fig. 12 Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert, The Drunken Drummer, 1525, engraving, 9.2 x 5.8 cm. Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden
Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert,  Bileam and the Ass,  ca. 1522,  Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig
Fig. 13 Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert, Bileam and the Ass, ca. 1522, ink drawing, 19.4 x 18.7 cm. Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig (artwork in the public domain).
Hans Holbein the Younger,  Luther as “Hercules germanicus, (From Heinrich, 1522, Zentralbibliothek, Zürich
Fig. 14 Hans Holbein the Younger, Luther as “Hercules germanicus,” 1522, woodcut, 34.5 x 22.6 cm (From Heinrich Brennwald and Johannes Stumpf, Schweizer Chronik, Ms. A 2, before p. 150). Zentralbibliothek, Zürich (artwork in the public domain).
  1. 1. This engraving is usually titled Three Peasants in Conversation (Bartsch 86), but based on their clothing, I doubt the two left-most figures are peasants.

  2. 2. Hans-Ernst Mittig, Dürers Bauernsäule: Ein Monument des Widerspruchs (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Verlag, 1984), esp. 32–47.

  3. 3. Hans-Joachim Raupp, Bauernsatiren: Entstehung und Entwicklung des bäuerlichen Genres in der deutschen und niederländischen Kunst ca. 1470–1570 (Niederzier: Lukassen Verlag, 1986).

  4. 4. Both Moxey and Stewart write about print designers in the so-called Little Masters circle, a group of artist in the generation following Dürer who were influenced by him. See Keith Moxey, Peasants, Wives and Warriors: Popular Imagery in the Reformation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989), and Alison Stewart, Before Bruegel: Sebald Beham and the Origins of Peasant Imagery (Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate Press, 2008).

  5. 5. Erwin Panofsky, “Dürers Stellung zur Antike,” [1922] in Sinn und Deutung in der bildenden Kunst (Cologne: Dumont Verlag, 1996), 274–350; and Erwin Panofksy, The Life and Work of Albrecht Dürer (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1943).

  6. 6. See the contribution by Michael Rohlmann, who recently emphasized Dürer’s emancipation from Italian art in the course of painting theRosenkranzfest. Michael Rohlmann, “Kunst in Nord und Süd – Bestellerinteressen der Frühen Neuzeit im Vergleich,” review of Kunstpatronage in der Frühen Neuzeit: Studien zu Kunstmarkt, Künstlern und ihren Auftraggebern in Italien und im Heiligen Römischen Reich (15.-17. Jahrhundert), by Bernd Roeck, Zeitschrift für historische Forschung 27 (2000): 407–13. On the emerging German nationalism, see Larry Silver, “Germanic Patriotism in the Age of Dürer,” in Dürer and His Culture: In Memory of Bob Scribner, 1941–1998, ed. Dagmar Eichberger and Charles Zika (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), 38–68. With reference to Konrad Celtis, see the recent publication of Jörg Robert,Konrad Celtis und das Projekt der deutschen Dichtung: Studien zur humanistischen Konstitution von Poetik, Philosophie, Nation und Ich(Tübingen: Niemeyer Verlag, 2003), 345–439.

  7. 7. See the studies by Panofsky named above and, as an introduction to Dürer’s journeys to Venice, Ludwig Grote,Albrecht Dürer: Reisen nach Venedig (Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1998).

  8. 8. Jan Bialostocki, Dürer and His Critics 1500–1971: Chapters in the History of Ideas (Baden-Baden: Koerner Verlag, 1986).

  9. 9. “Awch sind mir jr vill feind vnd machen mein ding in kirchen ab vnd wo sy es mügen bekumen. Noc schelten sy es vnd sagen, es sey nit antigisch art, dorum sey es nit gut.” Hans Rupprich,Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß (Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1956), 1:43–44.

  10. 10. “… jch hab awch dy moler all geschtilt, dy do sagten, jm stechen wer jch gut, aber jm molen west jch nit mit farben um zw gen. Jtz spricht jder man, sy haben schoner farben nie gesehen.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß, 1:55.

  11. 11. Leonardo da Vinci, Traktat von der Malerei (Jena: Diederichs Verlag, 1925), 48–49. For an excellent analysis ofaemulatio as a humanist practice, see Thomas Greene, The Light in Troy: Imitation and Discovery in Renaissance Poetry (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1982). 

  12. 12. Sybille Ebert-Schifferer, ed., Natur und Antike in der Renaissance(Exhibition at Liebighaus in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, December 5 – March 2, 1986),400–402, no. 97. 

  13. 13. Christiane Kruse, “Ars latet arte sua: Zur Kunst des Kunstverbergens im Barock,” in Animationen, Transgressionen: Das Kunstwerk als Lebewesen, eds. Ulrich Pfisterer and Anja Zimmermann (Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 2005), 95–113.

  14. 14. Plato, Symposium, trans. Seth Bernadette (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), 47 (217a).

  15. 15. For the Silenic-Socratic poetics of images, see Jürgen Müller, Das Paradox als Bildform: Studien zur Ikonologie Pieter Bruegels d. Ä. (Munich: Fink Verlag, 1999). With regard to the Laocoön, see Jürgen Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon: Ein Beitrag zur gemalten Kunsttheorie Hans Holbeins d.J,” inHans Holbein und der Wandel in der Kunst des frühen 16. Jahrhunderts, ed. Bodo Brinkmann and Wolfgang Schmid (Turnhout: Brepols, 2005), 73–89. One early discussion of ironic structures in art is Irving Lavin, “Divine Inspiration in Caravaggio’s Two St. Matthews,” Art Bulletin 56 (1974): 59–81. Furthermore, attention should be drawn to David A. Levine, “The Roman Limekilns of the Bamboccianti,” Art Bulletin 70 (1988): 569–89. Another important early publication on the theme is Reindert L. Falkenburg, “ ‘Alter Einoutus’: Over de aard en herkomst van Pieter Aertsens stillevenconceptie,” Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 40 (1989): 41–66. Finally, it must be said that all this research work is indebted to Erich Auerbach, who pointed to the ironic constitution of the “sermo humilis.” See Erich Auerbach, Mimesis: Dargestellte Wirklichkeit in der abendländischen Literatur (Bern and Stuttgart: Franke Verlag, 1988).

  16. 16. See  Wolfgang G. Müller, “Ironie, Lüge, Simulation, Dissimulation und verwandte rhetorische Termini,” in Zur Terminologie der Literaturwissenschaft: Akten des IX. Germanistischen Symposions der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft Würzbug 1986, ed. Christian Wagenknecht (Stuttgart: Metzler Verlag, 1986), 189–208.

  17. 17. “The bagpipe is the fool’s game/ he doesn’t respect the harp/ he doesn’t care for any good in the world/ besides his staff/ and pipe.” Sebastian Brant, Das Narrenschiff [1494], ed. Joachim Knape (Stuttgart: Reclam Verlag, 2005), 284.

  18. 18. As an introduction, see Matthias Winner, “Zum Nachleben des Laokoon in der Renaissance,” Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, n.s. 16 (1974): 83–121. See also the concise discussion of Dürer’s second journey to Venice and possibly Rome inFedja Anzelewsky, Albrecht Dürer: Das malerische Werk (Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1991). 

  19. 19. On the classical theory of imitation, see W. G. Pigmann III, “Versions of Imitation in the Renaissance,”Renaissance Quarterly 33 (1980): esp. 1–32. See also Klaus Irle, Der Ruhm der Bienen: Das Nachahmungsprinzip der italienischen Malerei von Raffael bis Rubens. (Münster and New York: Waxmann, 1997).

  20. 20. On the practice of dissimulatio of borrowed motifs, see Ernst H. Gombrich,Zur Kunst der Renaissance,vol. 1 (Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta Verlag, 1985), 16162. 

  21. 21. For instance, Leon Battista Alberti,On Painting, trans. Cecil Grayson (London: Penguin Books, Ltd., 1991).

  22. 22. “Aber dorbey ist zw melden, das ein ferstendiger geübter künstner jn grober bewrischer gestalt sein grossen gwalt vnd kunst ertzeigen kan mer jn eim geringen ding dan mencher jn ein grossen werg.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß, 3:284.

  23. 23. See Julius Held, Dürers Wirkung auf die niederländische Kunst seiner Zeit(The Hague: Nijhoff, 1931). 

  24. 24. “Am sontag nach unsers Herrn auffarth tag lud mich meister Dietrich, glaßmahler zu Antorff, und mir zu lieb viel anderer leuth, nehmlich darunter Alexander, goldschmiedt, ein statthafft reicher mann; und wir hetten ein köstlich mahl, und man thet mir groß ehr.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß,  1:169. 

  25. 25. “Jtem mehr hab ich geschenckt herr Jacob Panisio ein gutes gemahltes Veronicae angsicht, ein Eustachius, Melancholej und ein siczenden Hieronymum, S. Antonium, die 2 neuen Mariensbilder und den neuen bauren. So hab ich geschenckt sein schreiber, dem Erasmo, der mir die supplication gestellet hat, ein siczenden Hieronymum, die Melancoley, den Antonium, die 2 neuen Marienbildt, den bauern, vnd jch habe jhm auch 2 kleine Marienbildt geschickt, und das alles, das jch ihn geschenckt hab, ist werth 7 gulden.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß, 1:156-57.

  26. 26. For this theme, see Larry Silver, “The Ill-Matched Pair by Quentin Massys,” Studies in the History of Art 6 (1974): 4–23; and Alison Stewart,Unequal Lovers: A Study of Unequal Couples in Northern Art (New York: Abaris Books, 1977).

  27. 27. Raupp, Bauernsatiren.

  28. 28. Further examples in Raupp,Bauernsatiren, 48. 

  29. 29. There are no studies on Dirk Vellert’s complete works, but several studies focus on particular aspects. On the artist as painter, see Ludwig Baldass, “Dirk Vellert als Tafelmaler,” Belvedere 1 (1922): 162–67. As a graphic artist, see Henry Sayles Francis, “Dirk Vellert: Etcher,” Bulletin of the Cleveland Museum of Art 25 (1938): 6–10. As designer of glass painting, see the forthcoming book by Ellen Konowitz,Images in Light and Line: the Stained Glass Designs and Prints of Dirk Vellert(Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming, 2010).

  30. 30. Numbers, 20:21–33.

  31. 31. In his analysis of Pieter Aertsen, Reindert Falkenburg has referred in this context to the tradition of the paradoxical encomium, for which many examples can be found in antiquity and which has found its most prominent example in Erasmus’s Praise of Folly. See Falkenburg, “‘Alter Einoutus,’” and Reindert Falkenburg, “Pieter Aertsen, Rhyparographer,” in Rhetoric-Rhétoriquers-Rederijkers, eds. J. Koopmans, M. Meadow, M. Spies (Amsterdam: Royal Netherlandish Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995), 197–215.

  32. 32. See J. Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon.”

  33. 33. On the Laocoon reception in Italian art theory, see Salvatore Settis,Laocoonte: Fama e stile (Roma: Donzelli, 1999).

  34. 34. The statue was found on January 14, 1506, on the property of Felice de’ Freddi near S. Maria Maggiore in Rome. For the rediscovery, see Francis Haskell and Nicholas Penny, Taste and the Antique: The Lure of Classical Sculpture, 1500–1900 (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1981), 243–47.

  35. 35. Hans Henrik Brummer, “The Statue Court in the Vatican Belvedere,”Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis – Stockholm Studies in History of Art 20 (1970). See also, Leonard Barkan,Unearthing the Past: Archaeology and Aesthetics in the Making of Renaissance Culture (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999).

  36. 36. On Tommaso Inghirami and an imperial rhetoric of the Church, see Luca D’Ascia, Erasmo e l´Umanesimo romano (Florence: Olschki, 1991). Also Luca D’Ascia, “Una ‘Laudatio Ciceronis’ inedita di Tommaso ‘Fedra’ Inghirami,”Rivista di letteratura italiana 5 (1987): 479–501.

  37. 37. “Of course!” Erasmus von Rotterdam, “Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür: Ein Dialog,” in Ausgewählte Schriften: Lateinisch/Deutsch, ed. Werner Welzig, vol. 5 (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990), 13.

  38. 38. Erasmus von Rotterdam,“Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür,” 11.

  39. 39. For a comprehensive interpretation with bibliographical references see J. Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon.”

  40. 40. On the veneration of Hercules by the ancient Germans, see Publius Cornelius Tacitus, Agricola, Germania, Dialogus de Oratoribus, Die historischen Versuche, trans. Karl Büchner (Stuttgart: Alfred Kröner Verlag, 1985) 150–51. 

  41. 41. On the perceptibility of the stylistic difference between “welsch” and “deutsch,” see Michael Baxandall, Die Kunst der Bildschnitzer: Tilman Riemenschneider, Veit Stoß und ihre Zeitgenossen (Munich: Beck Verlag, 1984), 144–51.

  42. 42. Martin Luther, Aufbruch zur Reformation, ed. Karin Bornkamm and Gerhard Ebeling (Frankfurt am Main and Leipzig: Insel Verlag, 1995), 182.

  43. 43. For the exploitation of the Laocoön, see J. Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon.”73–89. On the figure of Pope Julius II, Erasmus’s polemical dialogue is still the classic work. See Erasmus von Rotterdam, “Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür.”

  44. 44. On the modernity of the Reformation,see Werner Hofmann, introduction to Luther und die Folgen für die Kunst (Exhibition at Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany, November 11, 1983 – January 8, 1984), ed. Werner Hofmann (Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1983), xvii–xix.

Alberti, LeonBattista.On Painting. Translated by Cecil Grayson. London: Penguin Books, Ltd., 1991.

Anzelewsky, Fedja. Albrecht Dürer: Das malerische Werk. Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1991.

Auerbach, Erich. Mimesis: Dargestellte Wirklichkeit in der abendländischen Literatur. Bernand Stuttgart: Franke Verlag, 1988.

Barkan, Leonard. Unearthing the Past: Archaeology and Aesthetics in the Making of Renaissance Culture. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999.

Baldass, Ludwig.“Dirk Vellert als Tafelmaler,” Belvedere 1 (1922): 162–67.

Baxandall, Michael. Die Kunst der Bildschnitzer: Tilman Riemenschneider, Veit Stoß und ihre Zeitgenossen. Munich: Beck Verlag, 1984.

Bialostocki, Jan. Dürer and His Critics 1500–1971: Chapters in the History of Ideas. Baden-Baden: Koerner Verlag, 1986.

Brant, Sebastian. Das Narrenschiff [1494]. Edited by Joachim Knape. Stuttgart: Reclam Verlag, 2005.

Brummer, Hans Henrik. The Statue Court in the Vatican Belvedere. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1970.

D’Ascia, Luca. “Una ‘Laudatio Ciceronis’ inedita di Tommaso ‘Fedra’ Inghirami,” Rivista di letteratura italiana 5 (1987): 479–501.

D’Ascia, Luca. Erasmo e l´Umanesimo romano. Florence: Olschki, 1991.

Ebert-Schifferer, Sybille, ed.Natur und Antike in der Renaissance (Exhibition at Liebighaus in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, December 5 – March 2, 1986). Frankfurt am Main: Liebighaus Museum Alter Plastik, 1985.

Falkenburg, Reindert L.“‘Alter Einoutus:’ Over de aard en herkomst van Pieter Aertsens stillevenconceptie.” Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek40 (1989): 41–66.

____________. “Pieter Aertsen, Rhyparographer.” In Rhetoric-Rhétoriquers-Rederijkers, edited by J. Koopmans, M. Meadow, and M. Spies, 197–215. Amsterdam: Royal Netherlandish Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995.

Francis, Henry Sayles. “Dirk Vellert: Etcher.” Bulletin of the Cleveland Museum of Art25 (1938): 6–10.

Gombrich,Ernst H. Zur Kunst der Renaissance. Vol. 1. Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta Verlag, 1985.

Greene, Thomas. The Light in Troy: Imitation and Discovery in Renaissance Poetry. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1982.

Grote, Ludwig.Albrecht Dürer: Reisen nach Venedig. Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1998.

Haskell, Francis, and Nicholas Penny. Taste and the Antique: The Lure of Classical Sculpture, 1500–1900. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1981.

Held, Julius. Dürers Wirkung auf die niederländische Kunst seiner Zeit. The Hague: Nijhoff, 1931.

Hofmann, Werner. Introduction to Luther und die Folgen für die Kunst (Exhibition at Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany, November 11, 1983 – January 8, 1984). Edited by Werner Hofmann. Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1983.

Irle, Klaus. Der Ruhm der Bienen: Das Nachahmungsprinzip der italienischen Malerei von Raffael bis Rubens. Münster and New York: Waxmann, 1997.

Konowitz, Ellen. Images in Light and Line: The Stained Glass Designs and Prints of Dirk Vellert. Turnhout: Brepols [forthcoming, 2010].

Kruse, Christiane. “Ars latet arte sua: Zur Kunst des Kunstverbergens im Barock.” In Animationen, Transgressionen: Das Kunstwerk als Lebewesen, edited by Ulrich Pfisterer and Anja Zimmermann, 95–113. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 2005.

Lavin, Irving. “Divine Inspiration in Caravaggio’s Two St. Matthews.” Art Bulletin56 (1974): 59–81.

Leonardo da Vinci. Traktat von der Malerei. Jena: Diederichs Verlag, 1925.

Levine, David A. “The Roman Limekilns of the Bamboccianti.” Art Bulletin70 (1988): 569–89.

Luther, Martin. Aufbruch zur Reformation. Edited by Karin Bornkamm and Gerhard Ebeling. Frankfurt am Main and Leipzig: Insel Verlag, 1995.

Mittig, Hans-Ernst. Dürers Bauernsäule: Ein Monument des Widerspruchs. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Verlag, 1984.

Moxey, Keith. Peasants, Wives and Warriors: Popular Imagery in the Reformation, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.

Müller, Jürgen. Das Paradox als Bildform: Studien zur Ikonologie Pieter Bruegels d. Ä. Munich: Fink Verlag, 1999.

Müller, Jürgen. “Holbein und Laokoon: Ein Beitrag zur gemalten Kunsttheorie Hans Holbeins d.J.” In Hans Holbein und der Wandel in der Kunst des frühen 16. Jahrhunderts, edited by Bodo Brinkmann and Wolfgang Schmid, 73–89. Turnhout: Brepols, 2005.

Müller, Wolfgang G. “Ironie, Lüge, Simulation, Dissimulation und verwandte rhetorische Termini.” In Zur Terminologie der Literaturwissenschaft: Akten des IX. Germanistischen Symposions der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft Würzbug 1986, edited by Christian Wagenknecht, 189–208. Stuttgart: Metzler Verlag, 1986.

Panofsky, Erwin. “Dürers Stellung zur Antike” [1922]. In Sinn und Deutung in der bildenden Kunst, 274–350. Cologne: Dumont Verlag, 1996.

Panofksy, Erwin. The Life and Work of Albrecht Dürer. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1943.

Pigmann III, W. G. “Versions of Imitation in the Renaissance,” Renaissance Quarterly 33, (1980): 1–33.

Plato, Symposium. Translated by Seth Bernadette. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Raupp, Hans-Joachim. Bauernsatiren: Entstehung und Entwicklung des bäuerlichen Genres in der deutschen und niederländischen Kunst ca. 1470–1570. Niederzier: Lukassen Verlag, 1986.

Robert, Jörg.Konrad Celtis und das Projekt der deutschen Dichtung: Studien zur humanistischen Konstitution von Poetik, Philosophie, Nation und Ich. Tübingen: Niemeyer Verlag, 2003.

Rohlmann, Michael. “Kunst in Nord und Süd – Bestellerinteressen der Frühen Neuzeit im Vergleich.” Review of Kunstpatronage in der Frühen Neuzeit: Studien zu Kunstmarkt, Künstlern und ihren Auftraggebern in Italien und im Heiligen Römischen Reich (15.-17. Jahrhundert), by Bernd Roeck. Zeitschrift für historische Forschung 27 (2000): 407–13.

Rotterdam, Erasmus von. “Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür: Ein Dialog” In Ausgewählte Schriften: Lateinisch/Deutsch, edited by Werner Welzig. Vol. 5. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990.

Rupprich, Hans. Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß. Vols. 1-5. Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1956–69.

Settis, Salvatore. Laocoonte: Fama e stile. Rome: Donzelli, 1999.

Silver, Larry. “Germanic Patriotism in the Age of Dürer.” In Dürer and His Culture: In Memory of Bob Scribner, 1941–1998, edited by Dagmar Eichberger and Charles Zika, 38–68. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Silver, Larry. “The Ill-Matched Pair by Quentin Massys.” Studies in the History of Art 6 (1974): 4–23.

Stewart, Alison. Unequal Lovers: A Study of Unequal Couples in Northern Art. New York: Abaris Books, 1977.

Stewart, Alison. Before Bruegel: Sebald Beham and the Origins of Peasant Imagery, Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate Press, 2008.

Tacitus, Publius Cornelius. Agricola, Germania, Dialogus de Oratoribus, Die historischen Versuche. Translated by Karl Büchner. Stuttgart: Alfred Kröner Verlag, 1985.

Winner, Matthias. “Zum Nachleben des Laokoon in der Renaissance,” Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen n.s. 16 (1974): 83–121.

List of Illustrations

Albrecht Dürer,  Bagpiper, 1514,  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Fig. 1 Albrecht Dürer, Bagpiper, 1514, engraving, 11.5 x 7.4 cm. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (artwork in the public domain).
Albrecht Dürer,  Peasant Couple Dancing, 1514,  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Fig. 2 Albrecht Dürer, Peasant Couple Dancing, 1514, engraving, 11.7 x 7.5 cm. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (artwork in the public domain).
Roman copy after Praxiteles,  Piping Faun,  second century C.E.,  Collection Borghese, Rome
Fig. 3 Roman copy after Praxiteles, Piping Faun, second century C.E., marble, h. 132 cm. Collection Borghese, Rome (artwork in the public domain).
Jacopo Alari-Bonacolsi, called Antico,  Young Hercules Reading,  ca. 1500,  Private Collection
Fig. 4 Jacopo Alari-Bonacolsi, called Antico, Young Hercules Reading, ca. 1500, bronze, h. 22.9 cm. Private Collection (artwork in the public domain).
Woodcut for 54th chapter, Sebastian Brant, Ship , 1495,
Fig. 5 Woodcut for 54th chapter, Sebastian Brant, Ship of Fools, 1495 (artwork in the public domain).
 Laocoön Group,  mid-first century C.E.,  Vatican Collection, Rome
Fig. 6 Laocoön Group, mid-first century C.E., marble, h. 242 cm. Vatican Collection, Rome (artwork in public domain).
Albrecht Dürer,  Samson Slaying the Philistines (sketches for th, 1510,  Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Fig. 7 Albrecht Dürer, Samson Slaying the Philistines (sketches for the Georg Fugger Epitaph), 1510, gray wash and brush on colored paper, 32.1 x 15.6 cm. Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin (artwork in the public domain).
Albrecht Dürer,  Peasants at the Market, 1519,  Metropolitan Museum, New York
Fig. 8 Albrecht Dürer, Peasants at the Market, 1519, engraving, 11.6 x 7.3 cm. Metropolitan Museum, New York (artwork in the public domain).
Master bxg,  Unequal Lovers,  ca. 1480,  Bibliothèque nationale, Paris
Fig. 9 Master bxg, Unequal Lovers, ca. 1480, engraving, 8.3 x 5.9 cm. Bibliothèque nationale, Paris (artwork in the public domain).
 Sarcophagus Rinuccini,  second century C.E.,  Antikensammlung, Altes Museum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Fig. 10 Sarcophagus Rinuccini, second century C.E., marble, h. 212 cm. Antikensammlung, Altes Museum, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin,  (artwork in the public domain).
Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert,  Bacchus, 1522,  Print Room, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
Fig. 11 Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert, Bacchus, 1522, engraving and etching, 7.2 x 5.1 cm. Print Room, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (artwork in the public domain).
Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert,  The Drunken Drummer, 1525,  Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden
Fig. 12 Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert, The Drunken Drummer, 1525, engraving, 9.2 x 5.8 cm. Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden
Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert,  Bileam and the Ass,  ca. 1522,  Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig
Fig. 13 Dirk Jacobsz. Vellert, Bileam and the Ass, ca. 1522, ink drawing, 19.4 x 18.7 cm. Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig (artwork in the public domain).
Hans Holbein the Younger,  Luther as “Hercules germanicus, (From Heinrich, 1522, Zentralbibliothek, Zürich
Fig. 14 Hans Holbein the Younger, Luther as “Hercules germanicus,” 1522, woodcut, 34.5 x 22.6 cm (From Heinrich Brennwald and Johannes Stumpf, Schweizer Chronik, Ms. A 2, before p. 150). Zentralbibliothek, Zürich (artwork in the public domain).

Footnotes

  1. 1. This engraving is usually titled Three Peasants in Conversation (Bartsch 86), but based on their clothing, I doubt the two left-most figures are peasants.

  2. 2. Hans-Ernst Mittig, Dürers Bauernsäule: Ein Monument des Widerspruchs (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Verlag, 1984), esp. 32–47.

  3. 3. Hans-Joachim Raupp, Bauernsatiren: Entstehung und Entwicklung des bäuerlichen Genres in der deutschen und niederländischen Kunst ca. 1470–1570 (Niederzier: Lukassen Verlag, 1986).

  4. 4. Both Moxey and Stewart write about print designers in the so-called Little Masters circle, a group of artist in the generation following Dürer who were influenced by him. See Keith Moxey, Peasants, Wives and Warriors: Popular Imagery in the Reformation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989), and Alison Stewart, Before Bruegel: Sebald Beham and the Origins of Peasant Imagery (Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate Press, 2008).

  5. 5. Erwin Panofsky, “Dürers Stellung zur Antike,” [1922] in Sinn und Deutung in der bildenden Kunst (Cologne: Dumont Verlag, 1996), 274–350; and Erwin Panofksy, The Life and Work of Albrecht Dürer (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1943).

  6. 6. See the contribution by Michael Rohlmann, who recently emphasized Dürer’s emancipation from Italian art in the course of painting theRosenkranzfest. Michael Rohlmann, “Kunst in Nord und Süd – Bestellerinteressen der Frühen Neuzeit im Vergleich,” review of Kunstpatronage in der Frühen Neuzeit: Studien zu Kunstmarkt, Künstlern und ihren Auftraggebern in Italien und im Heiligen Römischen Reich (15.-17. Jahrhundert), by Bernd Roeck, Zeitschrift für historische Forschung 27 (2000): 407–13. On the emerging German nationalism, see Larry Silver, “Germanic Patriotism in the Age of Dürer,” in Dürer and His Culture: In Memory of Bob Scribner, 1941–1998, ed. Dagmar Eichberger and Charles Zika (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), 38–68. With reference to Konrad Celtis, see the recent publication of Jörg Robert,Konrad Celtis und das Projekt der deutschen Dichtung: Studien zur humanistischen Konstitution von Poetik, Philosophie, Nation und Ich(Tübingen: Niemeyer Verlag, 2003), 345–439.

  7. 7. See the studies by Panofsky named above and, as an introduction to Dürer’s journeys to Venice, Ludwig Grote,Albrecht Dürer: Reisen nach Venedig (Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1998).

  8. 8. Jan Bialostocki, Dürer and His Critics 1500–1971: Chapters in the History of Ideas (Baden-Baden: Koerner Verlag, 1986).

  9. 9. “Awch sind mir jr vill feind vnd machen mein ding in kirchen ab vnd wo sy es mügen bekumen. Noc schelten sy es vnd sagen, es sey nit antigisch art, dorum sey es nit gut.” Hans Rupprich,Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß (Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1956), 1:43–44.

  10. 10. “… jch hab awch dy moler all geschtilt, dy do sagten, jm stechen wer jch gut, aber jm molen west jch nit mit farben um zw gen. Jtz spricht jder man, sy haben schoner farben nie gesehen.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß, 1:55.

  11. 11. Leonardo da Vinci, Traktat von der Malerei (Jena: Diederichs Verlag, 1925), 48–49. For an excellent analysis ofaemulatio as a humanist practice, see Thomas Greene, The Light in Troy: Imitation and Discovery in Renaissance Poetry (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1982). 

  12. 12. Sybille Ebert-Schifferer, ed., Natur und Antike in der Renaissance(Exhibition at Liebighaus in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, December 5 – March 2, 1986),400–402, no. 97. 

  13. 13. Christiane Kruse, “Ars latet arte sua: Zur Kunst des Kunstverbergens im Barock,” in Animationen, Transgressionen: Das Kunstwerk als Lebewesen, eds. Ulrich Pfisterer and Anja Zimmermann (Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 2005), 95–113.

  14. 14. Plato, Symposium, trans. Seth Bernadette (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001), 47 (217a).

  15. 15. For the Silenic-Socratic poetics of images, see Jürgen Müller, Das Paradox als Bildform: Studien zur Ikonologie Pieter Bruegels d. Ä. (Munich: Fink Verlag, 1999). With regard to the Laocoön, see Jürgen Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon: Ein Beitrag zur gemalten Kunsttheorie Hans Holbeins d.J,” inHans Holbein und der Wandel in der Kunst des frühen 16. Jahrhunderts, ed. Bodo Brinkmann and Wolfgang Schmid (Turnhout: Brepols, 2005), 73–89. One early discussion of ironic structures in art is Irving Lavin, “Divine Inspiration in Caravaggio’s Two St. Matthews,” Art Bulletin 56 (1974): 59–81. Furthermore, attention should be drawn to David A. Levine, “The Roman Limekilns of the Bamboccianti,” Art Bulletin 70 (1988): 569–89. Another important early publication on the theme is Reindert L. Falkenburg, “ ‘Alter Einoutus’: Over de aard en herkomst van Pieter Aertsens stillevenconceptie,” Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 40 (1989): 41–66. Finally, it must be said that all this research work is indebted to Erich Auerbach, who pointed to the ironic constitution of the “sermo humilis.” See Erich Auerbach, Mimesis: Dargestellte Wirklichkeit in der abendländischen Literatur (Bern and Stuttgart: Franke Verlag, 1988).

  16. 16. See  Wolfgang G. Müller, “Ironie, Lüge, Simulation, Dissimulation und verwandte rhetorische Termini,” in Zur Terminologie der Literaturwissenschaft: Akten des IX. Germanistischen Symposions der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft Würzbug 1986, ed. Christian Wagenknecht (Stuttgart: Metzler Verlag, 1986), 189–208.

  17. 17. “The bagpipe is the fool’s game/ he doesn’t respect the harp/ he doesn’t care for any good in the world/ besides his staff/ and pipe.” Sebastian Brant, Das Narrenschiff [1494], ed. Joachim Knape (Stuttgart: Reclam Verlag, 2005), 284.

  18. 18. As an introduction, see Matthias Winner, “Zum Nachleben des Laokoon in der Renaissance,” Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen, n.s. 16 (1974): 83–121. See also the concise discussion of Dürer’s second journey to Venice and possibly Rome inFedja Anzelewsky, Albrecht Dürer: Das malerische Werk (Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1991). 

  19. 19. On the classical theory of imitation, see W. G. Pigmann III, “Versions of Imitation in the Renaissance,”Renaissance Quarterly 33 (1980): esp. 1–32. See also Klaus Irle, Der Ruhm der Bienen: Das Nachahmungsprinzip der italienischen Malerei von Raffael bis Rubens. (Münster and New York: Waxmann, 1997).

  20. 20. On the practice of dissimulatio of borrowed motifs, see Ernst H. Gombrich,Zur Kunst der Renaissance,vol. 1 (Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta Verlag, 1985), 16162. 

  21. 21. For instance, Leon Battista Alberti,On Painting, trans. Cecil Grayson (London: Penguin Books, Ltd., 1991).

  22. 22. “Aber dorbey ist zw melden, das ein ferstendiger geübter künstner jn grober bewrischer gestalt sein grossen gwalt vnd kunst ertzeigen kan mer jn eim geringen ding dan mencher jn ein grossen werg.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß, 3:284.

  23. 23. See Julius Held, Dürers Wirkung auf die niederländische Kunst seiner Zeit(The Hague: Nijhoff, 1931). 

  24. 24. “Am sontag nach unsers Herrn auffarth tag lud mich meister Dietrich, glaßmahler zu Antorff, und mir zu lieb viel anderer leuth, nehmlich darunter Alexander, goldschmiedt, ein statthafft reicher mann; und wir hetten ein köstlich mahl, und man thet mir groß ehr.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß,  1:169. 

  25. 25. “Jtem mehr hab ich geschenckt herr Jacob Panisio ein gutes gemahltes Veronicae angsicht, ein Eustachius, Melancholej und ein siczenden Hieronymum, S. Antonium, die 2 neuen Mariensbilder und den neuen bauren. So hab ich geschenckt sein schreiber, dem Erasmo, der mir die supplication gestellet hat, ein siczenden Hieronymum, die Melancoley, den Antonium, die 2 neuen Marienbildt, den bauern, vnd jch habe jhm auch 2 kleine Marienbildt geschickt, und das alles, das jch ihn geschenckt hab, ist werth 7 gulden.” Rupprich, Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß, 1:156-57.

  26. 26. For this theme, see Larry Silver, “The Ill-Matched Pair by Quentin Massys,” Studies in the History of Art 6 (1974): 4–23; and Alison Stewart,Unequal Lovers: A Study of Unequal Couples in Northern Art (New York: Abaris Books, 1977).

  27. 27. Raupp, Bauernsatiren.

  28. 28. Further examples in Raupp,Bauernsatiren, 48. 

  29. 29. There are no studies on Dirk Vellert’s complete works, but several studies focus on particular aspects. On the artist as painter, see Ludwig Baldass, “Dirk Vellert als Tafelmaler,” Belvedere 1 (1922): 162–67. As a graphic artist, see Henry Sayles Francis, “Dirk Vellert: Etcher,” Bulletin of the Cleveland Museum of Art 25 (1938): 6–10. As designer of glass painting, see the forthcoming book by Ellen Konowitz,Images in Light and Line: the Stained Glass Designs and Prints of Dirk Vellert(Turnhout: Brepols, forthcoming, 2010).

  30. 30. Numbers, 20:21–33.

  31. 31. In his analysis of Pieter Aertsen, Reindert Falkenburg has referred in this context to the tradition of the paradoxical encomium, for which many examples can be found in antiquity and which has found its most prominent example in Erasmus’s Praise of Folly. See Falkenburg, “‘Alter Einoutus,’” and Reindert Falkenburg, “Pieter Aertsen, Rhyparographer,” in Rhetoric-Rhétoriquers-Rederijkers, eds. J. Koopmans, M. Meadow, M. Spies (Amsterdam: Royal Netherlandish Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995), 197–215.

  32. 32. See J. Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon.”

  33. 33. On the Laocoon reception in Italian art theory, see Salvatore Settis,Laocoonte: Fama e stile (Roma: Donzelli, 1999).

  34. 34. The statue was found on January 14, 1506, on the property of Felice de’ Freddi near S. Maria Maggiore in Rome. For the rediscovery, see Francis Haskell and Nicholas Penny, Taste and the Antique: The Lure of Classical Sculpture, 1500–1900 (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1981), 243–47.

  35. 35. Hans Henrik Brummer, “The Statue Court in the Vatican Belvedere,”Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis – Stockholm Studies in History of Art 20 (1970). See also, Leonard Barkan,Unearthing the Past: Archaeology and Aesthetics in the Making of Renaissance Culture (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999).

  36. 36. On Tommaso Inghirami and an imperial rhetoric of the Church, see Luca D’Ascia, Erasmo e l´Umanesimo romano (Florence: Olschki, 1991). Also Luca D’Ascia, “Una ‘Laudatio Ciceronis’ inedita di Tommaso ‘Fedra’ Inghirami,”Rivista di letteratura italiana 5 (1987): 479–501.

  37. 37. “Of course!” Erasmus von Rotterdam, “Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür: Ein Dialog,” in Ausgewählte Schriften: Lateinisch/Deutsch, ed. Werner Welzig, vol. 5 (Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990), 13.

  38. 38. Erasmus von Rotterdam,“Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür,” 11.

  39. 39. For a comprehensive interpretation with bibliographical references see J. Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon.”

  40. 40. On the veneration of Hercules by the ancient Germans, see Publius Cornelius Tacitus, Agricola, Germania, Dialogus de Oratoribus, Die historischen Versuche, trans. Karl Büchner (Stuttgart: Alfred Kröner Verlag, 1985) 150–51. 

  41. 41. On the perceptibility of the stylistic difference between “welsch” and “deutsch,” see Michael Baxandall, Die Kunst der Bildschnitzer: Tilman Riemenschneider, Veit Stoß und ihre Zeitgenossen (Munich: Beck Verlag, 1984), 144–51.

  42. 42. Martin Luther, Aufbruch zur Reformation, ed. Karin Bornkamm and Gerhard Ebeling (Frankfurt am Main and Leipzig: Insel Verlag, 1995), 182.

  43. 43. For the exploitation of the Laocoön, see J. Müller, “Holbein und Laokoon.”73–89. On the figure of Pope Julius II, Erasmus’s polemical dialogue is still the classic work. See Erasmus von Rotterdam, “Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür.”

  44. 44. On the modernity of the Reformation,see Werner Hofmann, introduction to Luther und die Folgen für die Kunst (Exhibition at Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany, November 11, 1983 – January 8, 1984), ed. Werner Hofmann (Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1983), xvii–xix.

Bibliography

Alberti, LeonBattista.On Painting. Translated by Cecil Grayson. London: Penguin Books, Ltd., 1991.

Anzelewsky, Fedja. Albrecht Dürer: Das malerische Werk. Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1991.

Auerbach, Erich. Mimesis: Dargestellte Wirklichkeit in der abendländischen Literatur. Bernand Stuttgart: Franke Verlag, 1988.

Barkan, Leonard. Unearthing the Past: Archaeology and Aesthetics in the Making of Renaissance Culture. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999.

Baldass, Ludwig.“Dirk Vellert als Tafelmaler,” Belvedere 1 (1922): 162–67.

Baxandall, Michael. Die Kunst der Bildschnitzer: Tilman Riemenschneider, Veit Stoß und ihre Zeitgenossen. Munich: Beck Verlag, 1984.

Bialostocki, Jan. Dürer and His Critics 1500–1971: Chapters in the History of Ideas. Baden-Baden: Koerner Verlag, 1986.

Brant, Sebastian. Das Narrenschiff [1494]. Edited by Joachim Knape. Stuttgart: Reclam Verlag, 2005.

Brummer, Hans Henrik. The Statue Court in the Vatican Belvedere. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1970.

D’Ascia, Luca. “Una ‘Laudatio Ciceronis’ inedita di Tommaso ‘Fedra’ Inghirami,” Rivista di letteratura italiana 5 (1987): 479–501.

D’Ascia, Luca. Erasmo e l´Umanesimo romano. Florence: Olschki, 1991.

Ebert-Schifferer, Sybille, ed.Natur und Antike in der Renaissance (Exhibition at Liebighaus in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, December 5 – March 2, 1986). Frankfurt am Main: Liebighaus Museum Alter Plastik, 1985.

Falkenburg, Reindert L.“‘Alter Einoutus:’ Over de aard en herkomst van Pieter Aertsens stillevenconceptie.” Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek40 (1989): 41–66.

____________. “Pieter Aertsen, Rhyparographer.” In Rhetoric-Rhétoriquers-Rederijkers, edited by J. Koopmans, M. Meadow, and M. Spies, 197–215. Amsterdam: Royal Netherlandish Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995.

Francis, Henry Sayles. “Dirk Vellert: Etcher.” Bulletin of the Cleveland Museum of Art25 (1938): 6–10.

Gombrich,Ernst H. Zur Kunst der Renaissance. Vol. 1. Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta Verlag, 1985.

Greene, Thomas. The Light in Troy: Imitation and Discovery in Renaissance Poetry. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1982.

Grote, Ludwig.Albrecht Dürer: Reisen nach Venedig. Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1998.

Haskell, Francis, and Nicholas Penny. Taste and the Antique: The Lure of Classical Sculpture, 1500–1900. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1981.

Held, Julius. Dürers Wirkung auf die niederländische Kunst seiner Zeit. The Hague: Nijhoff, 1931.

Hofmann, Werner. Introduction to Luther und die Folgen für die Kunst (Exhibition at Hamburger Kunsthalle, Germany, November 11, 1983 – January 8, 1984). Edited by Werner Hofmann. Munich: Prestel Verlag, 1983.

Irle, Klaus. Der Ruhm der Bienen: Das Nachahmungsprinzip der italienischen Malerei von Raffael bis Rubens. Münster and New York: Waxmann, 1997.

Konowitz, Ellen. Images in Light and Line: The Stained Glass Designs and Prints of Dirk Vellert. Turnhout: Brepols [forthcoming, 2010].

Kruse, Christiane. “Ars latet arte sua: Zur Kunst des Kunstverbergens im Barock.” In Animationen, Transgressionen: Das Kunstwerk als Lebewesen, edited by Ulrich Pfisterer and Anja Zimmermann, 95–113. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 2005.

Lavin, Irving. “Divine Inspiration in Caravaggio’s Two St. Matthews.” Art Bulletin56 (1974): 59–81.

Leonardo da Vinci. Traktat von der Malerei. Jena: Diederichs Verlag, 1925.

Levine, David A. “The Roman Limekilns of the Bamboccianti.” Art Bulletin70 (1988): 569–89.

Luther, Martin. Aufbruch zur Reformation. Edited by Karin Bornkamm and Gerhard Ebeling. Frankfurt am Main and Leipzig: Insel Verlag, 1995.

Mittig, Hans-Ernst. Dürers Bauernsäule: Ein Monument des Widerspruchs. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer Verlag, 1984.

Moxey, Keith. Peasants, Wives and Warriors: Popular Imagery in the Reformation, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.

Müller, Jürgen. Das Paradox als Bildform: Studien zur Ikonologie Pieter Bruegels d. Ä. Munich: Fink Verlag, 1999.

Müller, Jürgen. “Holbein und Laokoon: Ein Beitrag zur gemalten Kunsttheorie Hans Holbeins d.J.” In Hans Holbein und der Wandel in der Kunst des frühen 16. Jahrhunderts, edited by Bodo Brinkmann and Wolfgang Schmid, 73–89. Turnhout: Brepols, 2005.

Müller, Wolfgang G. “Ironie, Lüge, Simulation, Dissimulation und verwandte rhetorische Termini.” In Zur Terminologie der Literaturwissenschaft: Akten des IX. Germanistischen Symposions der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft Würzbug 1986, edited by Christian Wagenknecht, 189–208. Stuttgart: Metzler Verlag, 1986.

Panofsky, Erwin. “Dürers Stellung zur Antike” [1922]. In Sinn und Deutung in der bildenden Kunst, 274–350. Cologne: Dumont Verlag, 1996.

Panofksy, Erwin. The Life and Work of Albrecht Dürer. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1943.

Pigmann III, W. G. “Versions of Imitation in the Renaissance,” Renaissance Quarterly 33, (1980): 1–33.

Plato, Symposium. Translated by Seth Bernadette. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Raupp, Hans-Joachim. Bauernsatiren: Entstehung und Entwicklung des bäuerlichen Genres in der deutschen und niederländischen Kunst ca. 1470–1570. Niederzier: Lukassen Verlag, 1986.

Robert, Jörg.Konrad Celtis und das Projekt der deutschen Dichtung: Studien zur humanistischen Konstitution von Poetik, Philosophie, Nation und Ich. Tübingen: Niemeyer Verlag, 2003.

Rohlmann, Michael. “Kunst in Nord und Süd – Bestellerinteressen der Frühen Neuzeit im Vergleich.” Review of Kunstpatronage in der Frühen Neuzeit: Studien zu Kunstmarkt, Künstlern und ihren Auftraggebern in Italien und im Heiligen Römischen Reich (15.-17. Jahrhundert), by Bernd Roeck. Zeitschrift für historische Forschung 27 (2000): 407–13.

Rotterdam, Erasmus von. “Julius vor der verschlossenen Himmelstür: Ein Dialog” In Ausgewählte Schriften: Lateinisch/Deutsch, edited by Werner Welzig. Vol. 5. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1990.

Rupprich, Hans. Dürer: Schriftlicher Nachlaß. Vols. 1-5. Berlin: Deutscher Verlag für Kunstwissenschaft, 1956–69.

Settis, Salvatore. Laocoonte: Fama e stile. Rome: Donzelli, 1999.

Silver, Larry. “Germanic Patriotism in the Age of Dürer.” In Dürer and His Culture: In Memory of Bob Scribner, 1941–1998, edited by Dagmar Eichberger and Charles Zika, 38–68. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Silver, Larry. “The Ill-Matched Pair by Quentin Massys.” Studies in the History of Art 6 (1974): 4–23.

Stewart, Alison. Unequal Lovers: A Study of Unequal Couples in Northern Art. New York: Abaris Books, 1977.

Stewart, Alison. Before Bruegel: Sebald Beham and the Origins of Peasant Imagery, Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate Press, 2008.

Tacitus, Publius Cornelius. Agricola, Germania, Dialogus de Oratoribus, Die historischen Versuche. Translated by Karl Büchner. Stuttgart: Alfred Kröner Verlag, 1985.

Winner, Matthias. “Zum Nachleben des Laokoon in der Renaissance,” Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen n.s. 16 (1974): 83–121.

Imprint

Review: Peer Review (Double Blind)
DOI: 10.5092/jhna.2011.3.1.2
License:
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Recommended Citation:
Jürgen Müller, "Albrecht Dürer’s Peasant Engravings: A Different Laocoön, or the Birth of Aesthetic Subversion in the Spirit of the Reformation," Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art 3:1 (Winter 2011) DOI: 10.5092/jhna.2011.3.1.2